Adirondack County Directory

 

               

 

  The Counties of the Adirondacks

 

 

    The big picture of the Adirondacks is made up of 105 towns and

    villages covering12 counties regions.  The Adirondack Park is a

    six million acre park with a myriad recreation and wilderness

    opportunities.  The Adirondack Park was created by the

    state legislature in 1892.  The Adirondack Park is now  home to

    approximately 135,000 residents     

 

 

 

    QUICK COUNTY FIND: 

 

    Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer,

    Lewis, Oneida, St. Lawrence, Saratoga, Warren and

    Washington

         

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Clinton County was named in honor of its first governor, George Clinton.   Originally Clinton County was part of Albany County; but because of the enormous size of this county, it was split into three parts in 1772.  One part being Charlotte County which was later renamed to Washington County.  Washington was split again in 1788 to form Clinton County.  At this point, Clinton County was much larger than today's territorial borders.  For in 1799, Essex County was made Clinton's area and also parts were hence given to Herkimer and Montgomery counties.  Once, again in 1808, more territory was take to form Franklin County.

Presently, Clinton county has 1,118 square miles with a population of  82,128 (2010 census) and borders Quebec (Canada) and Lake Champlain as a natural border for Vermont.  The Ausable River forms the large part of the southern border. Clinton County is partially within the Adirondack park jurisdiction.  Towns within are:  Altona, Au Sable, Beekmantown, Black Brook, Champlain, Chazy, Clinton, Dannemora, Ellenburg, Mooers, Peru, Saranac, Schuyler Falls and Plattsburgh in which the county seat located. 

         

 

       

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  Essex County didn't develop until 1799.  Previously it was part of the Charlotte County (now known as Washington County) as it became within the last generation of territorial changes.  The highest natural peak of the Adirondacks rest in this county, in the Town of Keene at Mount Marcy at 5,344'.  Essex County has 1,916 square miles with a population of 39,370 and rest entirely in the Adirondack Park. 

The county seat is in Elizabethtown on Court Street.  The towns in Essex include:  Chesterfield, Crown Point, Elizabethtown, Essex, Jay, Keene Lewis, Minerva, Moriah, Newcomb, North Elba (see Lake Placid), North Hudson, Schroon, St. Armand (see Saranac Lake), Ticonderoga, Westport, Willsboro and Wilmington.  Popular Hamlets in our townships are:  Lake Placid and Saranac Lake.

         

 

       

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  Franklin County was named in honor of Benjamin Franklin..  Most of the county's territory is located within the Adirondack Park 'blue line'.  In the late 1808, Franklin County was part of the Macomb's Purchase of 1791, and was split off from Clinton County to be formed.  Franklin County has 1,631 square miles with a population of 51,599 (2010 census). 

The county seat offices are in Malone on West Main Street.with the towns of:  Bangor, Bellmont, Bombay, Brandon, Brighton, Burke, Chateaugay, Constable, Dickinson, Duane, Fort Covington, Franklin, Harrietstown, Malone, Moria, Santa Clara, Tupper Lake, Waverly and Westville.  

 

         

 

       

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  Fulton County was named in honor of Robert Fulton who developed a commercial steamboat in the region.  Fulton County was split off from Montgomery County in 1838.  Only one adjustment in 1860, of 10 acres given to Hamilton County, created its current borders.  Much of the northern territory of Fulton County rests within the Park.

It hosts the towns of:  Bleecker, Broadalbin, Caroga, Ephratah, Johnstown, Mayfield, Northampton, Oppenheim, Perth and Stratford.  The population is 55,531 (2010 census).  County Seat Johnstown on West Main Street

 

         

 

       

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  Hamilton County shares the name with ten other counties in the USA of which eight were named after Alexander Hamilton, the first US Secretary of the Treasury.  Hamilton County has a population of only 4,836.  That is only 3 people per square mile!  Now that is country!  There are NO permanent traffic lights and lies entirely in the Adirondack Park. 

Silver Lake Wilderness encompasses much of Hamilton County with its 106,980 acres. Other wilderness regions of Hamilton are Jessup River, Siamese Wilderness Ponds, Pigeon Lake, Blue Ridge, West Canada Lake and Sargent Pond

Hamilton County towns are:  Arietta, Benson, Hope, Indian Lake, Inlet, Lake Pleasant, Long Lake, Morehouse, and Wells,  Hamlets you may be familiar with are Blue Mountain Lake, Raquette Lake, and Speculator village.

 

         

 

       

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  Herkimer County was named after General Nicholas Herkimer who died in the Battle of Oriskany during the Revolutionary War.  The county was created in 1791 from the county split off of Montgomery County.  Herkimer's boundaries changed in 1794 with parts taken for Onondaga County; and later in 1798, more taken to form Chenango County.  Yet later, more territory was taken for Oneida and St. Lawrence County.  Today, all of Herkimer County rests in the Adirondack Park jurisdiction.

Herkimer now consists of 1,458 square miles with a population 64,519 (2012 census), and includes the towns of:  Columbia, Fairfield, Frankfort, German Flatts, Herkimer, Ilion, Litchfield, Little Falls, Manheim, Newport, Norway, Ohio, Russia, Salisbury, Schuyler, Stark, Warren, Webb and Winfield.

 

         

 

       

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  Lewis County was named after Morgan Lewis, a Governor of New York when the county was established in 1805.  Lewis was split off from Oneida County and originally had only five towns.  Within a short period, townships developed such as:  Croghan, Denmark, Diana, Glenfield, Greig,  Harrisburg,  Lewis, Leyden, Lowville, Lyonsdale, Martinsburg, Montague, New Bremen, Osceola, Pinckney, Turin, Watson and West Turin.

Tug Hill is a popular recreation spot.   Lewis's county seat is in Lowville on North State Street and only the easterly part of the county is located in the Adirondack Park  "blue line".

 

 

         

 

       

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  Oneida County was named in honor of the Oneida, an Iroquoian tribe that had occupied the region.  New York counties were established in 1683, but through division, boundary adjustments, Oneida County was created in 1798 from parts of Herkimer County.  Later the county was transformed to a smaller county as Jefferson and Lewis Counties were developed from parts of this region.  Finally the last boundary adjustment in 1816 which took parts of Oneida to form Oswego County. 

Today the seat of Oneida is in Utica, and the county has 1,257 square miles with 234,878 population.  Towns include:  Annsville, Augusta, Ava, Boonville, Bridgewater, Camden, Deerfield, Florence, Floyd, Forestport, Kirkland, Lee, Marcy, Marshall, New Hartford, Paris, Remsen, Sangerfield, Steuben, Trenton, Vernon, Vienna, Western, Westmoreland,  and Whitestown.  Only a small part of the northeast part of Onieda County rest in the Adirondack Blue line.

 

         

 

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  St. Lawrence County was named for the Saint Lawrence River and is the largest county in New York.  The St. Lawrence County was part of the Macomb's Purchase of 1791, and started as Albany County; but because of its enormous size, it was redefined into other counties.   St. Lawrence was designed in 1802 with parts of Clinton, Herkimer and Montgomery Counties.   Ogdensburg, the city, historically was the county seat, and in 1828 the seat was moved to Canton. 

The population of St. Lawrence county is 111,944 (2010 census) and has 2,821 square miles.  The southern towns are within the blue lines of the Adirondack Park.  The town in St. Lawrence are:  Brasher, Canton, Clare, Clifton, Colton, DeKalb, De Peyster, Edward, Fine, Gouverneur, Hammond, Hermon, Hopkinton, Lawrence, Lisbon, Louisville, Macomb, Madrid, Massena, Morristown, Norfolk, Parishville, Piercefield, Pierrepont, Pitcairn, Potsdam, Rossie, Russell, Stockholm and Waddington.  St. Lawrence cities include Ogdensburg, and familiar hamlets and villages of Canton, Potsdam, Richville, and Waddington.

         

 

       

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  Saratoga County was split off from the huge Albany County in 1791.  Some say it name was from an Indian word "sah-rah-ka" or "Sarach-togue" meaning "The hill beside the river."  Saratoga is now home to 219,607 (census 2010) in only 844 square miles.  The northern western most part of Saratoga County resides in the Adirondack Park, but all residents enjoy the benefits of their park neighboring towns.

Saratoga is well known and prized for the famous Saratoga Race Course, gorgeous State Park, world-wide Performing Arts Center and other recreational activities.  Towns of Saratoga County include:  Ballston, Charlton, Clifton Park, Corinth, Day, Edinburg, Galway, Greenfield, Hadley, Halfmoon, Malta, Milton, Moreau, Northumberland, Providence, Saratoga, Stillwater, Waterford and Wilton with the cities of Mechanicville and Saratoga Springs..  The county seat is in Ballston Spa on McMaster Street.

 

         

 

       

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Warren County was established in 1683 as part of the Albany County, and named in honor of General Joseph Warren (an American Revolutionary hero of the Battle of Bunker Hill).   Warren County at that time was enormous and was later reduce in size by splitting off Clinton County in 1788, and later splitting to create Washington County in 1813. 

 

Today, Warren County has a total area of 932 square miles with a population of approximately 65,707 (2010 census) and includes the townships of:  Bolton, Chester, City of Glens Falls, Hague, Horicon, Johnsburg, Lake George, Lake Luzerne, Queensbury, Stony Creek, Thurman and Warrensburg.  Warren County's municipal government seat is located in Queensbury on Route 9.

 

 

 

 

         

 

       

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  Washington County was named for the Revolutionary War General (later President) George Washington.  The county was formed Albany County when it was split in three sectors in 1772.  One being Charlotte County (named after Queen Charlotte, wife of King George III) and later renamed Washington County.  The County was further sectioned off to make Clinton County, and later in 1813 Warren County was created from the territory.  Much of the county has lush rolling lands and farms; Granville and the surrounding township are rich in slate quarries. 

Townships include:  Argyle, Cambridge, Dresden, Easton, Fort Ann, Fort Edward, Granville, Greenwich, Hampton, Hartford, Hebron, Jackson, Kingsbury, Putnam, Salem, White Creek, and Whitehall.    The total population of the county is 63,216 (2010 census).  The county seat offices are located in Fort Edward on Broadway Street.

 

      

 

 

 

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